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If you like food, if you enjoy fun food, if you like food pictures, or like to cook food, here is a place to find good food reference. Did you notice the operative word was, “Food”? Have fun!post

Pink Lemonade Pie

Pink Lemonade Pie
  • 1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese, softened
  • 1 (6-ounce) container frozen pink lemonade concentrate, thawed
  • 1 (8-ounce) container frozen whipped topping, thawed
  • 4 drops red food color (optional)
  • 1 (9-inch) prepared shortbread pie crust (I have used a graham cracker crust too)
What To Do:
  1. In a medium bowl, beat cream cheese until smooth. Add lemonade concentrate and beat until well combined. Stir in whipped topping and food color, if desired.
  • Spoon into pie crust and freeze 20 minutes (see Note). Serve, or cover and chill until ready to serve
Note

What happens if you leave the pie in the freezer for longer than 20 minutes? It’s okay, Pink Lemonade Pie tastes great frozen, too. Just before serving, garnish with dollops of whipped cream and lemon slices.

Did You Know This About Food? (12 Pics)

Did You Know This About Food?

Cashews grow on trees like this:

Brussels sprouts grow in long stalks like this:

Did you know that in the 1830’s, ketchup was sold as a medicine? That’s right …the delicious condiment that we all know and love was once believed to cure a variety of ailments! But why don’t we use ketchup for its medicinal uses today?? …because it was a scam. In an effort to boost sales, one enterprising manufacturer bottled ketchup as “Dr. Miles’ Compound Extract of Tomato”, claiming that it had the capability to cure anything from baldness to athlete’s foot, and all points in between. In a counter-attack, the H.J. Heinz Company rooted out scientific studies which claimed that tomatoes had antioxidants which were beneficial in preventing cancers. While this is true, the carotenoid known as lycopene, which actually is present in ketchup, occurs in such small quantities that it does not provide any significant medical benefits to the consumer.

Carrots were originally purple.

McDonalds sells 75 hamburgers every second of every day.

Yams and sweet potatoes are not the same thing.

Ripe cranberries will bounce like rubber balls.

An average ear of corn has an even number of rows, usually 16.

Humans share 50% of their DNA with bananas.

Honey never spoils. You can eat 32,000-year-old honey.

Peanuts are not nuts. They grow in the ground like this, so they are legumes.

Pound cake got its name from its original recipe, which called for a pound each of butter, eggs, sugar, and flour.

The probability of you drinking a glass of water that contains a molecule of water that also passed through a dinosaur is almost 100%.

Honey is made from nectar and bee vomit.

Pineapples grow like this:

Quinoa is the seeds of this plant:

Kiwis grow on vines:

Ginger is the root of a plant:

 Cinnamon is just the inner part of this tree:

Artichokes are flowers that are eaten as buds. This is what they look like when flowered:

Spam is short for spiced ham.

The ever-popular hot weather treat known as the Popsicle™ was invented by Frank Epperson when he was just eleven years old. Born in 1894, Epperson was raised in San Francisco. One winter night in 1905, he mixed a soft drink made with soda water powder and water – a popular concoction at the time. He left a stirring stick in it and mistakenly left it on the porch overnight.

Epperson found the fruit-flavored substance frozen to the stick when he awoke the next morning, as temperatures had dropped to record lows during the night. Though he is said to have tasted it and shown it to his friends, he did little else with his accidental “invention” for a number of years.

More than 18 years later, in 1923, Epperson decided to apply for a patent on his “frozen ice on a stick.” He decided to call the novelty the “Eppsicle” ice pop. He also began producing the treat in several different flavors. By then, he was a father, and his children had begun referring to the Eppsicle as the Popsicle. Later he officially changed the name. That name has stuck for nearly a century.

In 1925, Epperson sold his rights to the Popsicle to the Joe Lowe Company in New York. The Popsicle gained popularity very quickly – first made with birch wood sticks and selling for just a nickel. Later, the twin Popsicle became available. This model had two sticks so that children could share the treat.

Peas are one of the most popular pizza topping in Brazil:

There are over 7,500 varieties of apples throughout the world, and it would take you 20 years to try them all if you had one each day.

How To Make Jam in the Microwave

How To Make Jam in the Microwave

You can also cook this small batch of jam on the stove-top. Simmer gently over medium heat, stirring occasionally, for about 15 minutes or until it reaches a loose jam consistency.

  • Prep time: 5 minutes
  • Cook time: 15 minutes
  • Yield: 1 to 1 1/2 cups of jam

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 to 3 cups berries or diced fruit
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup sugar, honey, or other sweetener
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons lemon juice, to taste

Equipment:

METHOD

1 Prepare the fruit: Remove all seeds, cores, pits, or other non-edible parts. Peels can be left or removed. Cut larger fruits like peaches and strawberries into small pieces. Berries can be left whole.

2 Macerate the fruit and sugar: Toss the prepared fruit with 1/4 to 1/2 cup of sugar or other sweetener and 1 to 2 tablespoons of lemon juice (to taste) in an 8-cup glass measuring cup or microwave-safe mixing bowl. If you’re using berries, lightly mash them to release their juices. Let the fruit macerate for at least a half an hour, until the sugar is dissolved and the fruit looks syrupy.

3 Microwave for 10 minutes, stirring halfway: Microwave the fruit, uncovered, at full power for 5 minutes. The fruit juices will bubble up as the fruit cooks, quadrupling in volume. Carefully remove the bowl using oven mitts (the glass will be hot), and stir the fruit. It will look quite loose and liquidy at this point. Return to the microwave and cook another 5 minutes.

4 Stir the fruit again: Remove the fruit from the microwave with oven mitts and stir it again.The jam will probably still look fairly syrupy at this point. Mash the fruit against the sides of the bowl if you’d like a smoother texture, or leave it as is for a chunkier texture.

5 Continue to microwave in 2 to 3 minute intervals. Stir the jam between each interval and continue cooking until the liquid concentrates to a sticky syrup that coats the back of the spatula and falls in heavy drips back into the bowl. Don’t worry if the jam still seems a little loose at this point; it will set more firmly as it cools. Total cooking time is usually around 15 minutes for most fruits.

If you’re unsure whether the jam ready, it’s best to err on the side of caution. Over-cooking can cause the jam to crystallize and harden. If the jam still seems loose after it cools, return it to the measuring cup and cook it a few more minutes.

6 Cool and store the jam: Transfer the jam to a canning jar or other storage container. Let it cool, uncovered, on the counter. Once cool, cover and store in the refrigerator for several weeks or freeze for up to 3 months.

Southern Cornbread (4 Pics)

Southern Cornbread

White cornmeal is used in most Southern cornbreads, but we could not find any here in California, so we used yellow cornmeal. If you can find white cornmeal, by all means use it.

  • Prep time: 15 minutes
  • Cook time: 20 minutes
  • Yield: Makes 8 servings

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 Tbsp bacon drippings
  • 2 cups cornmeal OR 1 1/2 cups cornmeal and 1/2 cup flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 Tbsp sugar (optional)
  • 1 egg (optional)
  • 1 1/4 cups buttermilk
  • 6 Tbsp unsalted butter, melted

METHOD

1 Preheat pan with bacon drippings: Put the bacon drippings in a 9 or 10-inch cast iron skillet and put the skillet into the oven. Then preheat the oven to 400° with the skillet inside. (If you don’t have an iron skillet, you can use an uncovered Dutch oven or a metal cake pan.)

southern-cornbread-method-1

2 Make the batter: Whisk together all the dry ingredients (cornmeal, baking soda, salt, sugar if using) in a large bowl. In another bowl, beat the egg (if using) and buttermilk until combined, then mix that into the bowl of dry ingredients. Stir in the melted butter.

3 Pour batter into hot skillet and bake: When the oven is hot, take out the skillet (carefully, as the handle will be hot!). Add the cornbread batter and make sure it is evenly distributed in the skillet.

southern-cornbread-method-2 southern-cornbread-method-3

Bake at 400°F for about 20 minutes, or until the edges are beginning to brown and a toothpick inserted in the center of the bread comes out clean.

4 Rest bread in skillet, then serve: Let the bread rest for 10-30 minutes in the skillet before cutting it into wedges and serving.

To avoid burning your hand because you’ve forgotten the pan is hot, I recommend placing a pot holder on the pan’s handle while the cornbread is resting, or cooling the handle down a bit with an ice cube.

Black Magic Chocolate Cake


Black Magic Chocolate Cake

                              2 cups sugar
                              1-3/4 cups all-purpose flour
                              3/4 cup Hershey’s Cocoa
                              2 teaspoons baking soda
                              1 teaspoon baking powder
                              1 teaspoon salt
                              2 eggs
                              1 cup buttermilk or sour milk
                              1 cup strong black coffee 
                              1/2 cup vegetable oil
                              1 teaspoon vanilla extract 

                            Preheat oven to 350. Grease and flour two 9-inch 
                            round baking pans or one 13x9x2-inch baking pan. 
                            In large bowl, stir together sugar, flour, cocoa, 
                            baking soda, baking powder and salt. Add eggs, 
                            buttermilk, coffee, oil and vanilla; beat on 
                            medium speed of electric mixer 2 minutes. Pour 
                            batter into prepared pans. 
                            Bake 30 – 35 minutes for round pans, 35 – 40 
                            minutes for rectangular pan.