Did You Know This About Food? (12 Pics)

Did You Know This About Food?

Cashews grow on trees like this:

Brussels sprouts grow in long stalks like this:

Did you know that in the 1830’s, ketchup was sold as a medicine? That’s right …the delicious condiment that we all know and love was once believed to cure a variety of ailments! But why don’t we use ketchup for its medicinal uses today?? …because it was a scam. In an effort to boost sales, one enterprising manufacturer bottled ketchup as “Dr. Miles’ Compound Extract of Tomato”, claiming that it had the capability to cure anything from baldness to athlete’s foot, and all points in between. In a counter-attack, the H.J. Heinz Company rooted out scientific studies which claimed that tomatoes had antioxidants which were beneficial in preventing cancers. While this is true, the carotenoid known as lycopene, which actually is present in ketchup, occurs in such small quantities that it does not provide any significant medical benefits to the consumer.

Carrots were originally purple.

McDonalds sells 75 hamburgers every second of every day.

Yams and sweet potatoes are not the same thing.

Ripe cranberries will bounce like rubber balls.

An average ear of corn has an even number of rows, usually 16.

Humans share 50% of their DNA with bananas.

Honey never spoils. You can eat 32,000-year-old honey.

Peanuts are not nuts. They grow in the ground like this, so they are legumes.

Pound cake got its name from its original recipe, which called for a pound each of butter, eggs, sugar, and flour.

The probability of you drinking a glass of water that contains a molecule of water that also passed through a dinosaur is almost 100%.

Honey is made from nectar and bee vomit.

Pineapples grow like this:

Quinoa is the seeds of this plant:

Kiwis grow on vines:

Ginger is the root of a plant:

 Cinnamon is just the inner part of this tree:

Artichokes are flowers that are eaten as buds. This is what they look like when flowered:

Spam is short for spiced ham.

The ever-popular hot weather treat known as the Popsicle™ was invented by Frank Epperson when he was just eleven years old. Born in 1894, Epperson was raised in San Francisco. One winter night in 1905, he mixed a soft drink made with soda water powder and water – a popular concoction at the time. He left a stirring stick in it and mistakenly left it on the porch overnight.

Epperson found the fruit-flavored substance frozen to the stick when he awoke the next morning, as temperatures had dropped to record lows during the night. Though he is said to have tasted it and shown it to his friends, he did little else with his accidental “invention” for a number of years.

More than 18 years later, in 1923, Epperson decided to apply for a patent on his “frozen ice on a stick.” He decided to call the novelty the “Eppsicle” ice pop. He also began producing the treat in several different flavors. By then, he was a father, and his children had begun referring to the Eppsicle as the Popsicle. Later he officially changed the name. That name has stuck for nearly a century.

In 1925, Epperson sold his rights to the Popsicle to the Joe Lowe Company in New York. The Popsicle gained popularity very quickly – first made with birch wood sticks and selling for just a nickel. Later, the twin Popsicle became available. This model had two sticks so that children could share the treat.

Peas are one of the most popular pizza topping in Brazil:

There are over 7,500 varieties of apples throughout the world, and it would take you 20 years to try them all if you had one each day.

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Author: Marie Yates Taylor

I'm living on the Texas Gulf Coast, where weather quickly changes. I post weather, disaster-related infos I receive, and weather history. And ... much more. Add your stories, and post along with me about your area too. Surviving is all about the public and informed preparedness.

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