Fast Food in the U.S. is on the Rise (20 Pics)

20. Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen: 2016 U.S. sales: $3.1 billion Fast Food In The U.S. Is on The Rise

19. Jack in the Box: 2016 U.S. sales: $3.5 billionFast Food In The U.S. Is on The Rise

18. Little Caesars: 2016 U.S. sales: $3.5 billion

Fast Food In The U.S. Is on The Rise

17. Arby’s: 2016 U.S. sales: $3.6 billion

Fast Food In The U.S. Is on The Rise

16. Dairy Queen: 2016 U.S. sales: $3.6 billion

Fast Food In The U.S. Is on The Rise

 

15. Carl’s Jr./Hardee’s: 2016 U.S. sales: $3.8 billion

Fast Food In The U.S. Is on The Rise

 

14. Chipotle: 2016 U.S. sales: $3.9 billion

Fast Food In The U.S. Is on The Rise

13. KFC: 2016 U.S. sales: $4.5 billionFast Food In The U.S. Is on The Rise

12. Sonic: 2016 U.S. sales: $4.5 billion

Fast Food In The U.S. Is on The Rise

11. Panera Bread: 2016 U.S. sales: $5.2 billionFast Food In The U.S. Is on The Rise

10. Domino’s: 2016 U.S. sales: $5.3 billionFast Food In The U.S. Is on The Rise

9. Pizza Hut: 2016 U.S. sales: $5.8 billionFast Food In The U.S. Is on The Rise

 

8. Chick-fil-A: 2016 U.S. sales: $8 billionFast Food In The U.S. Is on The Rise

 

7. Dunkin’ Donuts: 2016 U.S. sales: $8.2 billionFast Food In The U.S. Is on The Rise

6. Taco Bell: 2016 U.S. sales: $9.4 billionFast Food In The U.S. Is on The Rise

5. Burger King: 2016 U.S. sales: $9.7 billionFast Food In The U.S. Is on The Rise

4. Wendy’s: 2016 U.S. sales: $9.9 billionFast Food In The U.S. Is on The Rise

3. Subway: 2016 U.S. sales: $11.3 billion

Fast Food In The U.S. Is on The Rise

 

2. Starbucks: 2016 U.S. sales: $14.8 billionFast Food In The U.S. Is on The Rise

1. McDonald’s: 2016 U.S. sales: $36.4 billion

Fast Food In The U.S. Is on The Rise

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Blackberry Country Cobbler

Fresh blackberries and a super-easy biscuit mix come together for a classic Blackberry Country Cobbler that just can’t be beat.

What You’ll Need:

  • 3 cups fresh blackberries
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 1/2 cups biscuit baking mix
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter for dotting

What To Do:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. In a large bowl, toss together blackberries, lemon juice, and vanilla. Spoon mixture into a buttered 8-inch square baking pan.
  3. In a medium bowl, combine biscuit baking mix, brown sugar, and cinnamon. Sprinkle over blackberry mixture then dot with butter.
  4. Bake 45 to 55 minutes, or until just crispy.

SERVES
6
COOK TIME
1 Hr

Best Butterscotch Pudding

From America’s Test Kitchen Season 14: Decadent Desserts
Why this recipe works:
For butterscotch pudding with rich, bittersweet flavor, we made butterscotch sauce by cooking butter, brown and white sugar, corn syrup, lemon juice, and salt together into a dark caramel. We made the process more foolproof by first boiling the caramel to jump-start it and then reducing the…
read more

Serves 8
When taking the temperature of the caramel in step 1, tilt the pan and move the thermometer back and forth to equalize hot and cool spots. Work quickly when pouring the caramel mixture over the egg mixture in step 4 to ensure proper thickening. Serve the pudding with lightly sweetened whipped cream.
Ingredients

  • tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • cup (3 1/2 ounces) granulated sugar
  • cup packed (3 1/2 ounces) dark brown sugar
  • cup water
  • tablespoons light corn syrup
  • teaspoon lemon juice
  • teaspoon salt
  • cup heavy cream
  • cups whole milk
  • large egg yolks
  • cup cornstarch
  • teaspoons vanilla extract
  • teaspoon dark rum

Instructions

1. Bring butter, granulated sugar, brown sugar, water, corn syrup, lemon juice, and salt to boil in large saucepan over medium heat, stirring occasionally to dissolve sugar and melt butter. Once mixture is at full rolling boil, cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes (caramel will register about 240 degrees). Immediately reduce heat to medium-low and gently simmer (caramel should maintain steady stream of lazy bubbles—if not, adjust heat accordingly), stirring frequently, until mixture is color of dark peanut butter, 12 to 16 minutes longer (caramel will register about 300 degrees and should have slight burnt smell).
2. Remove pan from heat; carefully pour 1/4 cup cream into caramel mixture and swirl to incorporate (mixture will bubble and steam); let bubbling subside. Whisk vigorously and scrape corners of pan until mixture is completely smooth, at least 30 seconds. Return pan to medium heat and gradually whisk in remaining 3/4 cup cream until smooth. Whisk in 2 cups milk until mixture is smooth, making sure to scrape corners and edges of pan to remove any remaining bits of caramel.
3. Meanwhile, microwave remaining ¼ cup milk until simmering, 30 to 45 seconds. Whisk egg yolks and cornstarch together in large bowl until smooth. Gradually whisk in hot milk until smooth; set aside (do not refrigerate).
4. Return saucepan to medium-high heat and bring mixture to full rolling boil, whisking frequently. Once mixture is boiling rapidly and beginning to climb toward top of pan, immediately pour into bowl with yolk mixture in 1 motion (do not add gradually). Whisk thoroughly for 10 to 15 seconds (mixture will thicken after a few seconds). Whisk in vanilla and rum. Spray piece of parchment paper with vegetable oil spray and press on surface of pudding. Refrigerate until cold and set, at least 3 hours. Whisk pudding until smooth before serving.
Technique
Smoother Route to Pudding?
Pudding recipes almost always have you temper the yolks and cornstarch (i.e., add some hot dairy to the mixture to gradually raise its temperature), add everything to the remaining dairy in the pot, and stir constantly as the mixture slowly comes to a boil and thickens. Inevitably, bits of egg still overcook and need to be strained. We wondered if there was a better way.
EXPERIMENT:
We made one batch of pudding the conventional way and a second batch in which the yolks never saw the heat of the stove: We added a little warm milk to the yolks and cornstarch, brought the remaining “dairy” (in our recipe, the butterscotch mixture) to a boil, and then dumped this hot liquid over the egg mixture and whisked briefly as the pudding thickened almost instantly.
RESULTS:
The conventional pudding needed straining, while the “no-cook” custard was utterly smooth and perfectly thickened.
EXPLANATION:
Boiling pudding is overkill. When cornstarch is combined with liquid, it thickens between 144 and 180 degrees, while yolks diluted by liquid coagulate between 180 and 185 degrees—significantly lower temperatures than the boiling point of 212 degrees. Whisking the hot butterscotch mixture into the yolk mixture heated the pudding to about 185 degrees—plenty hot to properly thicken it but not so hot that the yolks overcooked.alt
DUMP AND STIR
Technique
A New Way to Consistently Perfect Caramel
The rich flavor of our butterscotch pudding depends on cooking the caramel mixture to 300 degrees before adding the cream, but it’s easy to over- or undercook that mixture when it’s boiled from start to finish (the usual approach). Our more forgiving method: Boil the caramel over medium heat until it reaches 240 degrees, then reduce the heat to medium-low, and gently simmer it until it reaches 300 degrees. The simmer phase takes about 12 to 16 minutes—plenty of time in which to grab a thermometer and the cream.

Banana Pudding: 2 Hours, 15 Minutes

Banana Pudding

Yield:
 Makes 8 servings
Total: 2 Hours, 15 Minutes 
Pudding
1 (12-oz.) package vanilla wafers 
5 ripe bananas, sliced 
2 cups milk 
1/2 cup sugar* 
1/3 cup all-purpose flour 
3 egg yolks 
1/8 teaspoon salt 
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract 
Meringue
3 egg whites 
1/4 cup sugar 
Preparation
1. 1. Prepare Pudding: Preheat oven to 325°. Arrange one-third of vanilla wafers in a medium-size ovenproof bowl (about 2 qt.); cover with one-third of banana slices. Repeat layers twice with remaining vanilla wafers and bananas.
2. 2. Whisk together milk and next 4 ingredients in a heavy saucepan. Cook over medium-low heat, whisking constantly, 15 minutes or until pudding-like thickness. Remove from heat, and stir in vanilla. Pour over vanilla wafers and bananas in bowl.
3. 3. Prepare Meringue: Beat egg whites at medium speed with an electric mixer until foamy. Gradually add sugar, beating until sugar dissolves and stiff peaks form. Spread meringue over pudding, sealing to edge of bowl.
4. 4. Bake at 325° for 15 minutes or until golden. Serve immediately, or let cool completely (about 30 minutes), and cover and chill 1 hour before serving.
5. **1/2 cup no-calorie sweetener may be substituted. We tested with Splenda No-calorie Granulated Sweetener. (Do not substitute sweetener in meringue.)

Old-Fashioned Chocolate Pudding ~ Wolfgang Puck

A taste of summer: old-fashioned chocolate pudding
By Wolfgang Puck, Tribune Content Agency
In many parts of the country, we’re just a few weeks away from school letting out for summer. The season itself less than six weeks away, and we’re only a week and a half from Memorial Day weekend, which many people consider the unofficial start of summer. So it’s not surprising that many parents (as well as people who may have no kids at home but still like to pamper their inner children) are starting to think about fun cooking activities making warm-weather treats. One of my favorites has always been old-fashioned, cornstarch-thickened pudding, dating back to when my mother and grandmother prepared it for me and my siblings during my childhood in Austria.
I used the word “old-fashioned,” but I also know that puddings thickened this way are actually a relatively recent invention. The oldest puddings known were custard mixtures thickened with egg yolks. But in the 1830s, an Englishman named Andrew Bird first began selling a custard powder based on cornstarch, which he originally developed for his wife, who had an egg allergy. The product caught on, with such packaged pudding mixtures eventually becoming common worldwide.
In fact, today most people think of pudding as something based on a mix that comes in a small, colorful cardboard box. But it’s just as easy to make it from scratch, and you get better results because you have full control over what you put into it.
You’ll see what I mean when you prepare the recipe for Bittersweet Chocolate Pudding. It’s a simple mixture of milk, sugar, cocoa powder and bittersweet chocolate, plus a touch of butter for extra richness, hints of vanilla, just a little salt to enhance the taste and, of course, cornstarch to thicken it. Use your favorite good-quality chocolate and cocoa; you’ll get results that transform and concentrate the flavor you love into a perfectly smooth, creamy dessert.
It’s so easy. And children can join in, too, with adult supervision while working with heat. For the best results, the only step that calls for particular care is streaming the dry ingredients slowly into the liquid while stirring steadily, which prevents lumps from forming.
Only a few hours of refrigeration sets the pudding to a perfectly creamy, cool consistency. I like to cover the surface of each serving with a piece of plastic wrap, which prevents the formation of a chewy “skin” on the pudding as it cools. But then again, some people fondly remember the pudding’s skin as one of their favorite little treats to eat. Such are the pleasures of childhood, no matter how old you may be.
                                                    Bittersweet Chocolate Pudding
Serves 6 to 8
3 cups (750 mL) milk
1/2 cup (125 mL) sugar
3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
4 tablespoons cornstarch
6 ounces (185 g) bittersweet chocolate chips
1 ounce (30 g) unsalted butter
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/8 teaspoon kosher salt
Freshly whipped cream, for serving
Pitted fresh cherries or good-quality maraschino cherries, for serving
Pour the milk into a heavy metal saucepan. Stir in half of the sugar using a wire whisk. Put the pan over medium heat and bring the mixture to a boil, stirring frequently. Remove the pan from the heat.
Put the remaining sugar, cocoa powder and cornstarch into a medium-sized bowl. Use a clean, dry whisk to stir them together until thoroughly combined. While whisking the hot milk mixture continuously, gradually pour in the sugar-cocoa-cornstarch mixture in a slow, steady stream.
Return the saucepan to medium heat and clip a thermometer to the side of the pan, with its tip immersed in the mixture. Continue cooking, stirring continuously with the whisk and taking care to scrape the bottom and sides of the pan until the mixture has thickened to a consistency resembling molten jelly and reached a temperature of about 200 F. (93 C), about 4 minutes.
Remove the pan from the heat. Immediately whisk in the chocolate chips, butter, vanilla and salt, until the chocolate and butter have completely melted and are fully, incorporated.
Pour the hot mixture into individual serving glasses or bowls. Cover each with a piece of plastic wrap, gently pressing the plastic directly onto the surface of the pudding to prevent a skin from forming as it cools. Refrigerate until well chilled, at least two hours. Serve within three days, removing the plastic wrap and topping each serving with whipped cream and cherries.

Best Butterscotch Pudding

Best Butterscotch Pudding – America’s Test Kitchen

Best Butterscotch Pudding
From America’s Test Kitchen Season 14:
Decadent Desserts
Why this recipe works:
For butterscotch pudding with rich, bittersweet flavor, we made butterscotch sauce by cooking butter, brown and white sugar, corn syrup, lemon juice, and salt together into a dark caramel. We made the process more foolproof by first boiling the caramel to jump-start it and then reducing the…
read more
Serves 8
When taking the temperature of the caramel in step 1, tilt the pan and move the thermometer back and forth to equalize hot and cool spots. Work quickly when pouring the caramel mixture over the egg mixture in step 4 to ensure proper thickening. Serve the pudding with lightly sweetened whipped cream.
Ingredients

  • tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • cup (3 1/2 ounces) granulated sugar
  • cup packed (3 1/2 ounces) dark brown sugar
  • cup water
  • tablespoons light corn syrup
  • teaspoon lemon juice
  • teaspoon salt
  • cup heavy cream
  • cups whole milk
  • large egg yolks
  • cup cornstarch
  • teaspoons vanilla extract
  • teaspoon dark rum

Instructions

1. Bring butter, granulated sugar, brown sugar, water, corn syrup, lemon juice, and salt to boil in large saucepan over medium heat, stirring occasionally to dissolve sugar and melt butter. Once mixture is at full rolling boil, cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes (caramel will register about 240 degrees). Immediately reduce heat to medium-low and gently simmer (caramel should maintain steady stream of lazy bubbles—if not, adjust heat accordingly), stirring frequently, until mixture is color of dark peanut butter, 12 to 16 minutes longer (caramel will register about 300 degrees and should have slight burnt smell).
2. Remove pan from heat; carefully pour 1/4 cup cream into caramel mixture and swirl to incorporate (mixture will bubble and steam); let bubbling subside. Whisk vigorously and scrape corners of pan until mixture is completely smooth, at least 30 seconds. Return pan to medium heat and gradually whisk in remaining 3/4 cup cream until smooth. Whisk in 2 cups milk until mixture is smooth, making sure to scrape corners and edges of pan to remove any remaining bits of caramel.
3. Meanwhile, microwave remaining ¼ cup milk until simmering, 30 to 45 seconds. Whisk egg yolks and cornstarch together in large bowl until smooth. Gradually whisk in hot milk until smooth; set aside (do not refrigerate).
4. Return saucepan to medium-high heat and bring mixture to full rolling boil, whisking frequently. Once mixture is boiling rapidly and beginning to climb toward top of pan, immediately pour into bowl with yolk mixture in 1 motion (do not add gradually). Whisk thoroughly for 10 to 15 seconds (mixture will thicken after a few seconds). Whisk in vanilla and rum. Spray piece of parchment paper with vegetable oil spray and press on surface of pudding. Refrigerate until cold and set, at least 3 hours. Whisk pudding until smooth before serving.
Technique
Smoother Route to Pudding?
Pudding recipes almost always have you temper the yolks and cornstarch (i.e., add some hot dairy to the mixture to gradually raise its temperature), add everything to the remaining dairy in the pot, and stir constantly as the mixture slowly comes to a boil and thickens. Inevitably, bits of egg still overcook and need to be strained. We wondered if there was a better way.
EXPERIMENT:
We made one batch of pudding the conventional way and a second batch in which the yolks never saw the heat of the stove: We added a little warm milk to the yolks and cornstarch, brought the remaining “dairy” (in our recipe, the butterscotch mixture) to a boil, and then dumped this hot liquid over the egg mixture and whisked briefly as the pudding thickened almost instantly.
RESULTS:
The conventional pudding needed straining, while the “no-cook” custard was utterly smooth and perfectly thickened.
EXPLANATION:
Boiling pudding is overkill. When cornstarch is combined with liquid, it thickens between 144 and 180 degrees, while yolks diluted by liquid coagulate between 180 and 185 degrees—significantly lower temperatures than the boiling point of 212 degrees. Whisking the hot butterscotch mixture into the yolk mixture heated the pudding to about 185 degrees—plenty hot to properly thicken it but not so hot that the yolks overcooked.
alt
DUMP AND STIR
Technique
A New Way to Consistently Perfect Caramel
The rich flavor of our butterscotch pudding depends on cooking the caramel mixture to 300 degrees before adding the cream, but it’s easy to over- or undercook that mixture when it’s boiled from start to finish (the usual approach). Our more forgiving method: Boil the caramel over medium heat until it reaches 240 degrees, then reduce the heat to medium-low, and gently simmer it until it reaches 300 degrees. The simmer phase takes about 12 to 16 minutes—plenty of time in which to grab a thermometer and the cream.

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New Fashioned Banana Pudding

New Fashioned Banana Pudding

SERVES
8
COOK TIME
25 Min
Who doesn’t love great banana flavor? We think this New Fashioned Banana Pudding is so delicious, everyone will find it irresistible!
What You’ll Need:
  • 1 cup milk
  • 2 cups half-and-half
  • 1 (6-serving-size) package vanilla instant pudding and pie filling
  • 1 (12-ounce) package vanilla wafers
  • 6 large ripe bananas
  • 4 large egg whites
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla or banana extract
What To Do:
  1. In a large bowl, combine milk and half-and-half ; add pudding mix and beat at low speed with an electric mixer until blended. Beat at medium speed 2 minutes, or until smooth; set aside.
  2. Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Arrange one-third of vanilla wafers in bottom of a 3-quart baking dish. Slice 2 bananas; layer slices over wafers. Pour one-third of pudding mixture over bananas. Repeat layers twice, arranging wafers around edge of dish.
  3. Beat egg whites at high speed with an electric mixer until foamy. Add sugar, 1 tablespoon at a time, beating until stiff peaks form and sugar dissolves, 2 to 4 minutes. Fold in vanilla. Spread meringue over pudding, sealing to edge of dish.
  4. Bake 25 minutes, or until golden.
Notes
If you want even more classic Southern recipes, be sure to check out our free eCookbook, Down-Home Cookin’: 24 Easy Southern Favorites.